TWO COMMERCIAL AIRLINERS REPORT AN ALIEN CRAFT NEAR PHOENIX ARIZONA

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FEBURARY 24, 2018 ………….PHOENIX ARIZONA AREA

According to radio transmissions between the befuddled pilots and air traffic controllers (which you can listen to in full, thanks to an FAA recording recently released to the Phoenix New Times), the sighting occurred around 3:30 p.m. local time on Feb. 24, somewhere over the Sonoran Desert near Phoenix.

“Was anybody above us that passed us like 30 seconds ago?” the first pilot asked while flying a Learjet west toward California.

“OK,” the pilot responded. “Something did.”

The object, whatever it was, was flying high — at least a few thousand feet above the jet, which was cruising at an altitude of around 37,000 feet (11,000 m), the New Times reported. A few minutes later, the FAA asked another nearby flight — an American Airlines Airbus traveling in the same direction — to keep an eye out for anything “passing over” it in the desert.

The confused pilot agreed. And sure enough, within a few minutes, the Airbus crew saw the same mystery object fly over their plane.

“Yeah, something just passed over us,” the Airbus pilot reported. “I couldn’t make it out, whether it was a balloon or what … but it had a big reflection on it and it was several thousand feet above us, going the opposite direction.”

Several weeks later, authorities are still stumped as to the object’s origin. Beyond these two pilot reports, the FAA couldn’t verify that any other aircraft were around. It likely wasn’t a “Google balloon,” the FAA reported, nor a weather balloon or a military craft.

“We have a close working relationship with a number of other agencies and safely handle military aircraft and civilian aircraft of all types in that area every day, including high-altitude weather balloons,” an FAA representative told the New Times. NOTE: The above image is CGI.

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